From Europe to Mid-America

Notes


Matches 7,771 to 7,805 of 7,852

      «Prev «1 ... 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
7771 With respect to Snouffer Lake, as the years went by the lake became environmentally unsafe. The state Department of Environment and Natural Resources brought action in 1993 to close and drain the lake. The owners (Kay Snouffer Emery, Rita Snouffer Dickson, A. Charles Snouffer, Jr., and Sherry Snouffer Duncan) were held in contempt of court in 1999 for failing to comply with a court order to prepare a plan to breach and drain the lake. In June, 2000, the court ordered DENR to do the work, and the owners were required to reimburse the agency for the cost -- $50,000 to $120,000. The drainage work occurred in January, 2001. See, The Burlington [NC] Times-News (29 Jun 2000; 4 Jan 2001)(accessed through www.thetimesnews.com (March 2005). Snouffer, Alvin Charles (I3179)
 
7772 With respect to their "resignation" from the Harmony Society, The Pittsburgh [PA] Weekly Gazette, p. 3 (7 Feb 1832), contains the following:
"To the American Public.
"The undersigned, Members of the Harmony Society, at Economy, in the county of Beaver, Pennsylvania, deem it their duty thus publicly to make known, that all the authority or power which has heretofore been given, granted to, or exercised by GEORGE RAPP, or by his adopted son, FREDERICK RAPP, has ceased and determined, and has been revoked; and that their, or either of their acts, under such authority, in all transactions entered into by said George or Frederick Rapp, are without the knowledge, assent or agreement of the undersigned....
"All Banks, and other Corporations, and Individuals, who have heretofore transacted business with the said George and Frederick Rapp ... will take notice that all such connection between the undersigned and said George and Frederick Rapp has ceased, and the funds of the society can no longer be resorted to for the satisfaction of debts which have been, or shall be thus contracted by said Rapps....February 1, 1832. ***
"[219 persons, including:]
"George Schnaufer...
"John Schnaufer...
"Christiana Schnaufer..." 
Schnaufer, Johann Georg Friedrich (I11508)
 
7773 With respect to whether Billie's maiden name was Osbourne or Robinson, cousin Barbara Hannon wrote in Aug. 2007:
"First, Billie is still alive, but alas has Alzheimers and is in a nursing home. My mother last had a somewhat coherant conversation with her about 3 years ago....
Anyway, Billie Mildred Osbourne was born in Conroy, Texas, the next to the youngest child in a huge, very poor family. She had one brother, younger (James) but had multiple, multiple older siblings including; Eerie, Tommy Ruth, Deanie, Elvira, Lucille and a few older brothers (my mother cannot remember all their names). Billie's mother died when she and James were very young children and her sister Eerie, the oldest sibling, was married to a man named Ernest Robinson. Eerie and Ernest took in Billie and James and raised them with their own children. I do not think there was an official "adoption", but Billie always referred to her sister Eerie as almost "my mama". I would imagine everyone who saw James and Billie with Eerie and James [sic: Ernie] just assumed they were Eerie and Ernie's children. It was Eerie and Ernest who brought James and Billie to Dallas when they were children."

Death Notice, The Dallas [TX] Morning News (10 May 2009):
"Snouffer, Billie Mildred, age 88, Ennis, died May 07, 2009. Grove Hill Funeral Home...." (Accessed via www.GenealogyBank.com: Nov 2009)

According to the Social Security Death Index, Billie M. Snouffer (SSN 452-22-2035; issued in Texas) was born 16 Jul 1920 and died 7 May 2009 while living in Ennis, Ellis Cnty, TX. 
Osbourne, Billie Mildred (I588)
 
7774 With the passage of time this couple's surname devolved and morphed from Walls to Wall. By the time of their deaths, the surname was fairly consistently spelled without a concluding "s." Therefore I have chosen to list and index their surnames as Wall.  Wall, Ransom G. (I6348)
 
7775 Wm. J. Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, p. 143 (1928), confirms that as of the date of publication, Oscar was deceased, with the curt note: "Oscar dead." Snouffer, Oscar Lee (I864)
 
7776 Wm. J. Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, p. 143 (1928), states:
"John Benjamin Snouffer who lived on what was called the 'Frog Hollow' farm and later known as the Frank and Arthur White farm, now the property of the Baker interest, was married three times and was the father of twenty-two children. His first wife was Abbie Trail, his second wife was Malinda Moffett, his third wife was Annie Shreeve [sic]. [Children] Archibald and George [sic; Georgia] live in Oklahoma, Daniel in Colorado, Fannie in Kansas and Ashton on the Manor."

On 11 May 1835 John obtained a Frederick County license to marry Frances. See Dorothy H. Smith, Frederick County [MD] Marriage Licenses, 1778-1839, p. 209 (1979), which reads: "SNOUFFER, John B. & Frances Ellen Trail - May 11, 1835." The marriage to Abbie Trail was performed by the Rev. Henry H. Bean at St. Peter's Church, Poolesville, probably on 13 May 1835. See vol. 2, Western Maryland Genealogy, p.107 (Jul 1986). See also, LDS Film 882993.

The 1850 Maryland census showed John B. as a 34 yr old farmer living with Malinda and 3 children, Elizabeth A., George F. and William T. The census also suggests that he lived next to his step-mother Elizabeth. It also shows that there were 5 slaves and 1 white laborer living with them. 1850 U.S. Census, Buckeystown, Frederick Cnty, MD (M 432, Roll 293, stamped p. 223).

The 1860 census lists John as a 44 year old farmer living with a number of his children: Ann, 23; William, 22; "Boone," 7; Virginia, 4, Malinda, 9; and Fannie, 2 months. 1860 U.S. Census, Buckeystown, Frederick Cnty, MD (M 653, Roll 475, stamped p. 871).

John B. had some bad luck as a farmer on at least one rented farm. He ran into financial difficulty in the early 1850's. On 3 Aug. 1852 he petitioned for protection by the bankruptcy laws; his brother Archibald T. was appointed his trustee. John B. had been sued by creditors on some of his debts; the law suit was complicated by actions of the farm's owner. See opinions of the Maryland Court of Appeals in Trail ex rel. Buckey v. John B. Snouffer, vol. 6, Md. Reports, p. 308 (1854); Buckey v. Archibald T. Snouffer, vol. 10, Md. Reports, p. 149 (1856). These financial difficulties were reported in the local newspaper on 11 Aug. 1852. See, M.Hitselberger, "Abstracts from The Examiner, Frederick, Md., 1852," in vol. 17, Western Maryland Genealogy, p. 230 (Oct. 2001): "Snouffer, John B., insolvent petitioner. Report not made by Archibald T. Snouffer. Joseph M. Palmer & Charles E. Trail, attorneys for Pet. Circuit Court: Jacob M. Buckey vs. Archibald T. Snouffer. Report before 3d Monday Oct. [sic-1 Oct.?] Claims before 4th Monday Feb. next."

John B. also had bad luck while living in Roanoke County, VA, where sons Daniel Branch and Robert were born. On 10 June 1868 he purchased some 777 acres of land from G.W. Hansbrough for $25,000. The deed mentioned that the tract included a mountain tract of 135 acres. After about 10 years, during which he had sold some parcels of the land, he discovered that he had purchased 107 acres of "valueless" mountain land. He stopped making payments and sued the sellers for fraud. The trial court found that there was no fraud and that he incurred no damages. He died during the litigation; his administrator appealed but lost. See Snouffer's Administrator v. Hansbrough, vol. 79, Virginia Reports, p. 166 (1884).

The 1880 census shows the family living in Kansas. It lists "Snauffer, J.B.," as a 64 year old farmer, born in Maryland, living with his wife "Annie," 44, also born in Maryland, who was "keeping house," together with children "Abbey," 18, "Thomas," 11, "Daniel," 7, and Lewis A, 5. The census also lists a 5 year old black boy, with the name "Snauffer, Lee J," living in the household. 1880 U.S. Census, Louisburg, Montgomery Cnty, KS (T 9, Roll 390, stamped p. 298)[LDS Film 1254390]. 
Snouffer, John Benjamin (I284)
 
7777 Wm. J. Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, p. 168 (1928), states:
"Benjamin Thomas, son of Mark Thomas and Elizabeth Winsett [sic], born 1741, in St. Mary's County, Maryland, married in 1771, Eleanor Wells, daugher of William and Susanna Norman Wells of St. Mary's County, Maryland. Removed to Frederick County, Maryland and received his commission in the middle district of Frederick County as 3rd [sic] Lieutenant of the 34th Battalion, June 18, 1776. (Recorded in Maryland Archives of Journal and Correspondence Folio 171-475-476.)"
Writing about the "old Thomas burying ground in the southern end of Carrollton Manor..." Grove (Ibid, at 168-169) reports: "I find on many of the tombstones is cut a tree, cross, bird, lamb, coffin or a figure of some kind. The following names appear on the stones: 'In memory of Benjamin Thomas, who departed this life on the 29th of June, 1816, age 73 years.' 'In memory of Elinor [sic] Thomas.... [These are not precisely accurate readings of the headstones.] They are the parents of Captain Otho Thomas, who succeeded his father on the home farm where he lived all his life."

G.L. Thomas, ENGLISH THOMAS FAMILY, p. 7 (1956), writes:
"Benjamin married Eleanor, daughter of William Wells and Susannah (Wareman)[sic: Mareman or Maryman] Wells of St. Mary's County. They moved to Frederick County and Benjamin received his commission in the Middle District of Frederick County as 2nd Lieutenant and was added to the 34th Battalion June 18, 1776. Maryland Archives of Journal and Correspondance, Folio 171, 475-476."

According to Frederick Cnty, MD, Equity Records, Book JS-1, p. 63,
"Benjamin Thomas Sr. of Frederick C., Md d/ Jun 1816 intestate." The records list his survivors as follows: "ch/ Richard W.; Mary; Samuel H.; Sarah Renenberger; Elizabeth (Edward Thomas); Archibald; Levin; Otho; Benjamin; Darkiss (George Snouffer); Notley; William, dec (ch/ Mary & Elias, minors - Berkley Co, Va); Elias, dec (his ch/ Eliza, Richard & William Thomas, minors in Ohio)."
Disposition of the estate is summarized: "Land - part Res. on Hazzard (by Thomas & Martha Peter of DC by his father Robert Peter); part Thomas' Profit; part Mad Wife (350 acres together); Samuel S. & Elizabeth Thomas to Benjamin Thomas Sr.; William & Edward Thomas, separate parts to Robert Peter, then to Thomas Peter."

Benjamin is buried in the Thomas family cemetery, 1.5 miles East of Point of Rocks, MD. His tombstone, as of 12 Oct 2006, the top of which is broken, reads: "[broken] | Mem [broken] | of Benjamin Thomas | who DeParted this Life | on the 29 of June 1816 | in the 73rd Year of | his Age". 
Thomas, Benjamin (I317)
 
7778 Wm. J. Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, p. 168 (1928), writes:
"The ancestors of this branch of the Thomas family lived in the County of Kent, England in 1574. Their coat of arms dates back to that time. I have a fairly complete record of the family, beginning with Mark Thomas, who came from England (date not recorded), settled in St. Mary's County, Maryland, November 1738, married Elizabeth Winsett [sic], daughter of Richard and Eleanor Winsett [sic]. Issue: - Benjamin, John, Samuel, and Levin [sic]. (Copied from St. Andrew's Parish Record, St. Mary's County, Maryland.)"

G.L. Thomas, ENGLISH THOMAS FAMILY, p. 1 (1956), states:
"The English Thomases first settled in St. Mary's County, Maryland [,] coming from England, County of Kent, in November 1738. Mark Thomas settled there about this time. He met and married Elizabeth Wimsatt, daughter of Richard and Eleanor Wimsatt.... The family moved, westward, along the Potomac first, and settled in Frederick County near Point of Rocks, Maryland along what is now U.S. Route 15. Early members of the family are buried there in what is known, locally, as the Old English Thomas Burying Grounds, about three [&] one-half to five miles south of Adamstown, Maryland.... The family moved to Frederick County prior to June 18, 1776, for at that time a son, Benjamin, received a Commission, 2nd Lt. of the 34 Battalion, see, Maryland Archives of Journal, etc., folio 171, 475, 476. ***
"Mark Thomas came from England exact date of arrival not known, settled in St. Marys [sic] County. He married in November 1738. St. Andrews Parish Records, St. Marys [sic] County, Maryland.
"This Thomas Family dates back as far as 1574 and even earlier; but it was in that year that a Coat of Arms was granted to the family in England...." 
Thomas, Mark (I746)
 
7779 Wm. J. Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, p. 169 (1928), writing about the "old Thomas burying ground," reports: "Levin Thomas, died 1842, age 56 years.... Margaret Thomas, wife of Levin Thomas, born 1797, died aged 35 years." Dutrow / Duttero, Margaret E. (I766)
 
7780 Wm. J. Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, p.168 (1928) states: "Otho Thomas, son of Benjamin Thomas and Eleanor Wells, married Harriet Rawlings of Montgomery County, Maryland" and reports that they had 11 children.

Elswehere (Ibid, p. 118) Grove notes that, at a meeting on 4 June 1831 of the "National Republicans, Capt. Otho Thomas was named as a member of a committee to represent the Buckeystown District at a meeting of the General Committee of the National Republicans to be held on 11 June 1831."

Later (Ibid, p.392) he reports that "Among the older members and those who aided in building St. Paul's [Episcopal] church [in 1841] were the families of ... Captain Otho Thomas, John Wirts, Benjamin J. Snouffer...."

Finally (Ibid, p.169), writing about the "old Thomas burying ground in the southern end of Carrollton Manor," Grove notes that Otho's parents are buried there and that Otho "succeeded his father on the home farm where he lived all his life." He further writes that one of the headstones states: " 'In memory of Captain Otho Thomas, born November 15th, 1788, and died December 11th 1865.' Captain Thomas served in the war of 1812. He was one of the leading citizens of his time. He was the father of Charles E. Thomas...."

G.L. Thomas, ENGLISH THOMAS FAMILY, p. 34 (1956), follows Grove and lists the birthyear as 1788, and states that "He served in War of 1812 as Captain." Writing later (Ibid, p. 78) that Otho and his family lived in Licksville, MD, Thomas states: "He was a very wealthy and extensive farm land owner, in both Frederick and Montgomery Counties. There were 13 children, 3 [sic] of whom were named Otho, only one of whom reached maturity." 
Thomas, Otho B. (I326)
 
7781 Wm. J. Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, p.168 (1928) states: "Otho Thomas, son of Benjamin Thomas and Eleanor Wells, married Harriet Rawlings of Montgomery County, Maryland" and reports that they had 11 children.

G.L. Thomas, ENGLISH THOMAS FAMILY, p. 34 (1956), has a typographical mistake re Harriet's death year, giving it as 1851 rather than 1854. 
Rawlings, Harriet Elizabeth (I9053)
 
7782 Wm. J. Grove, HISTORYOF CARROLLTON MANOR, pp. 168-169 (1928), reports that Benjamin Thomas "married in 1771, Eleanor Wells, daughter of William and Susanna Norman Wells of St. Mary's County, Maryland." Writing further about the "old Thomas burying ground in the southern end of Carrollton Manor..." he says that he finds on many tombstones "a tree, cross, bird, lamb, coffin or a figure of some kind. The following names appear on the stones: ... 'In memory of Elinor [sic] Thomas, consort of Benjamin Thomas, who departed this life on 31 December 1812, age 64 years.' "

Elenor is buried in the Thomas Family Cemetery, 1.5 miles East of Point of Rocks, MD. An examination of the headstone on 12 Oct 2006 revealed a somewhat different display of information -- the headstone actually reads: "In | Memory | of Elenor Thomas | Consort of Benjamin | Thomas who Departed | this Life on the 31st of | December 1812 in the | .... Year of her Age". 
Wells, Elenor (I318)
 
7783 Wm. J. Grove, «i»HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR«/i», p. 168 (1928), reports that Jacob served in Company B, 35th Virginia Calvary, Rosser's Brigade, Confederate States Army. This is repeated in G.L. Thomas, «i»ENGLISH THOMAS FAMILY«/i», p. 78 (1956). Thomas, Jacob Nichols (I810)
 
7784 Wm. J. Grove, «i»HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR«/i», p. 175 (1928), reports that Benjamin was living in Washington (presumbably D.C.). Snouffer, Benjamin (I788)
 
7785 Wm. N. Hurley, Jr., in vol. 26, OUR MARYLAND HERITAGE, The Trail Families, p. 64 (Heritage Books, Inc., Bowie, MD: 2001), wrote:
"Child 5. William Trail, died c.1833. This son of William Trail (d/1783) and Frances Northcroft owned a tavern at Barnesville, Montgomery County, Maryland, and died c.1833. Married first to Priscilla Shaw, and second (or perhaps third) Jun 14, 1809 in Frederick County, Maryland to Abigail Hays, born June 5, 1789, died May 10, 1857, buried in the Hays Family burying ground at Barnesville;.... Division of the lands of William Trail, deceased, liber BS4, folio 283, Montgomery County, lists nine of his children. At least three children from his first marriage, and several from the marriage to Abigail Hays: ***
"4. Frances Ellen Trail, married May 13, 1853 in Frederick to John B. Snouffer."

On 11 May 1835 Frances and John obtained a Frederick County license to marry. See Dorothy H. Smith, Frederick County [MD] Marriage Licenses, 1778-1839, p. 209 (1979), which reads: "SNOUFFER, John B. & Frances Ellen Trail - May 11, 1835." The marriage to Abbie Trail was performed by the Rev. Henry H. Bean at St. Peter's Church, Poolesville, probably on 13 May 1835. See vol. 2, Western Maryland Genealogy, p.107 (Jul 1986). See also LDS Film 882993.
 
Trail, Frances Ellen ("Abbie") (I577)
 
7786 Wm.J.Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, p. 169 (1928), writing about "the old Thomas burying ground in the southern end of Carrollton Manor," reports: "Levin Thomas, died 1842, age 56 years. He was the son of Benjamin and brother of Captain Otho Thomas. Margaret Thomas, wife of Levin Thomas, born 1797, died aged 35 years."

Borrowing data from G.L.Thomas, ENGLISH THOMAS GENEALOGY, p. 34 (1956), Carl Thomas' website, Note NI-12247, states: "Robert Levin Thomas, born 1786, died December 17, 1842, married first Margaret Dutrow April 19, 1819, and second Eliza Markey October 15, 1833, she died January 2, 1843. I have 11 children for Benjamin Thomas and this Robert L. is one of them... He [Robert L.] had [8 children but] no children with his second wife." 
Thomas, Robert Levin (I765)
 
7787 Wm.J.Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, p. 174 (1928), states: "Mr. [George] Snouffer's first wife died in 1821, and he married her sister Elizabeth Thomas [sic: Elizabeth Ranneberger]. They had four children: George W., Michael, Henry and Elizabeth."

The 1850 Maryland census reported that "William H." was a 23-yr old farmer living with his mother Elizabeth and sister Sarah. 1850 U.S. Census, Buckeystown, Frederick Cnty, MD (M 432, Roll 293, stamped p. 223).

He married in 1851: "Snouffer, William Henry m. Sarah F. Bear at Carrollton Manor 18th inst., Rev. Hauer [2 April]." M.F.Hitselberger, "Marriages & Deaths from The Examiner, Frederick Md. 1851," vol. 14, Western Maryland Genealogy, p. 187 (1998). The marriage license was obtained in Frederick Cnty on 10 Mar 1851. See Margaret E. Myers, MARRIAGE LICENSES OF FREDERICK COUNTY, 1841-1865, pp. 15, 218 (1988).

William and Sarah Bear moved to Missouri in 1854-1855.

The 1870 census lists "Snowffer, William," as a 42 yr old farmer, born in Maryland, living with his wife Sarah, 40, also born in Maryland, who is "keeping house," and the following children, all born in Missouri: William, 15; James, 11; Lee, 10; Lucy, 6; Mary, 4; and George 1. 1870 U.S. Census, Clay twsp, Lafayette Cnty, MO (M 593, Roll 786, stamped p. 151).

The 1880 census lists "Snoffer, William," as a 52 year old laborer, born in Maryland, living with his wife [not named], 49, a "House Keeper," also born in Maryland, and their children, William, 24, James, 21, Robert Lee, 19, Lucy Ellen, 16, and Mary Eleanor, 14, all born in Missouri. 1880 U.S. Census, Enum. Dist. 42, Lafayette Cnty, MO (T 9, Roll 697, stamped p. 133).

William's sister, Sarah Elizabeth Snouffer, appears to have been the creator of a unique American quilt. It is featured in Barbara Brackman, CLUES IN THE CALICO: A GUIDE TO IDENTIFYING AND DATING ANTIQUE QUILTS, p. 8 (HPM Publications, Inc., McLean, VA: 1989). It is made in the "feathered star pattern" and has a bright chintz fabric border. As of late 2004, it is owned by Marilyn Woodin, curator of the Kalona Quilt and Textile Museum, Kalona, Iowa. She purchased it in 1986 from Donna Rae Shadden, a descendant of the Laub family which obtained it from the Snouffer family. (For a more detailed discussion of the quilt and its history, see the General Notes for William's sister, Sarah Elizabeth Snouffer.) 
Snouffer, William Henry (I321)
 
7788 Wm.J.Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, p. 162 (1928), writes: "William T. Chiswell, now living in Washington, served in the Confederate army." He then quotes at some length a tribute written by Wm.T.Chiswell: "During the Civil War Ellerslie, the home of [my father] Captain Chiswell, fed many a hungry confederate soldier, and protected them in their raids, as the manor woods was directly in the rear of the farm, and in the event of an attack they had a natural barrier in the rear through which to escape."

Wm.T. also had some musical abilities: "Buckeystown boasted of having two brass bands; one just before the Civil War... [members of which included] William T. Chiswell. Sometime after the Civl War another band was organized." (Ibid, p. 117).

"D.Calvin Bready gives me [ Wm.J.Grove ] an interesting description of General McCausland's raid and the part he took in the battle of the Monocacy. *** Mr. Bready *** joined McCausland's troops at Middletown and from there they marched to Jefferson ***. They marched through Jefferson and near the top of the mountain where the tollgate stood, here turned to the right and marched to Carrollton Manor,... until they reached the Point of Rocks or Manor road.*** They did not take part in the fight at Monocacy but continued on through Liberty and went on toward Baltimore where they burnt Governor Bradford's house. They continued on *** to Washington ***. Mr. Bready said [that] near Washington, he ran into Byron Thomas, Albert Lamar and Will Chiswell, who had left their homes on the Manor to join the Confederate army. They kept together and crossed the Potomac at White's Ford into Virginia and all had dinner together at Mr. Henry Ball's.... Among Mr. Ball's daughters was Mary Elizabeth, better known as Bettie, a dashing southern girl.... After the war was over William T. Chiswell married Bettie Ball. They lived happily together on Carrollton Manor where the following children were born: Henry Ball, Eleanor Lee, William Wallace, Benjamin White, Bertha Ball, Elizabeth Virginia, Catherine Ball, Helen May and Mary Harvey." Wm.J.Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, pp. 246-248 (1928). 
Chiswell, William Thomas (I884)
 
7789 Wm.J.Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, p. 168 (1928), reported that Levin served in Company B, 35th Virginia Calvary, Rosser's Brigade, Confederate States Army. This is repeated in G.L.Thomas, ENGLISH THOMAS FAMILY, p. 78 (1956).

The «i»Montgomery County [MD] Sentinel,«/i» p. 3 (22 Dec 1899) reported that "Levin Thomas, of Gaithersburg, died last Saturday [16 Dec]. He had served under Gen. Jubal Early." John D. Bowman, «i»Guide to Selections from the Montgomery County [MD] Sentinel, 1897 - 1901«/i», p. 124 (2007). 
Thomas, Levin (I814)
 
7790 Wm.J.Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, p. 168 (1928), reports that Edmond served in Company B, 35th Virginia Calvary, Rosser's Brigade, Confederate States Army. This is repeated in G.L.Thomas, ENGLISH THOMAS FAMILY, p. 78 (1956). Thomas, Edmond (I816)
 
7791 Wm.J.Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, p. 177 (1928), writes: "Wilson Trundle [was] the father of Joseph H. Trundle.... Mr. Trundle who lived on Carrollton Manor when his son, Joseph, joined the Confederate Army, was anxious Joe should have a fine young riding horse and followed the Confederate forces who were moving north to the battle of Gettysburg hoping to overtake Joe, who was marching with the army near Frederick. Instead of leading the horse, he tied the strap to the pummel [sic] of the saddle; on the road near Frederick the horse frightened and pulled the saddle, turning it [which] threw Mr. Trundle between the horses, badly injuring him. Mr. Trundle was taken to the City Hotel where he remained several weeks before he could be removed home." Trundle, Wilson (I1286)
 
7792 Wm.J.Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, p. 248 (1928), writes:
"Among Mr. [ Henry ] Ball's daughters was Mary Elizabeth, better known as Bettie, a dashing southern girl.... After the war was over William T. Chiswell married Bettie Ball. They lived happily together on Carrollton Manor where...[their] children were born." 
Ball, Mary Elizabeth (I954)
 
7793 Wm.J.Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, p. 95 (1928), reports:
"John A. Trundle was a prominent and successful farmer and slave holder. He owned the farm near Buckeystown Station, now owned by the Baker interests. Mr. Trundle was married twice. There were eleven children. His first wife was Miss Hays, and they had nine children; Hester, Elizabeth, Christie, Nannie, Hattie, Virginia, Johnnie, Samuel and George.... His second wife was Martha Plummer. They had two children." 
Trundle, John A. (I3157)
 
7794 Wm.J.Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, p. 95 (1928), reports:
"Samuel served throughout the war in the confederate army. He was a brave soldier. When he returned from the army he brought his cavalry horse with him, a handsome sorrell with a blaze face. He called him Star.... Mr. Trundle married Alice, a daughter of Captain Joseph N. Chiswell." 
Trundle, Samuel H. (I953)
 
7795 Wm.J.Grove, HISTORY OF CARROLLTON MANOR, pp.21-22 (1928), writes: "The farm where Charles Carroll made his headquarters when he came to look after Carrollton Manor was the farm called Tuscarora, and this is one of the farms that still belongs to the original heirs of Charles Carroll of Carrollton. *** Tuscarora, the Carrollton Manor Mansion is a large commodious building, three stories high with a basement under the whole building. It is built of native limestone....*** The mansion still stands, and the workmanship shows that it was well done by skilled mechanics. *** Other prominent gentlemen not connected with the Carroll family but leading families of Carrollton Manor who lived at the Carroll Mansion, Tuscarora, were: David Bready whose family is still a prominent one on the Manor..." Bready, David (I712)
 
7796 Woody is a retired police officer.  Rush, Woody (I9402)
 
7797 Woody Rush has written:
"Noah and Catherine were given slaves as a wedding gift. He freed them and this caused trouble, so in 1854 he moved his family from Maryland to Missouri. There he became an abolitionist and helped smuggle slaves across the border into Canada. They later moved to Omaha, Nebraska. After his wife's death, he returned to Maryland. Source-American Boyers."
(Email from WRUSH550@aol.com (31 Jul 2016).  
Byers, Noah Amos (I3533)
 
7798 Writing about his grandson Joseph Byers, T.J.C. Williams & F. McKinsey, History of Frederick County Maryland, p. 860 (L.R. Titsworth & Co., Hagerstown, MD : 1910), state:
"The Byers, formerly spelled Boyer, family is of German descent. Gabriel Boyer, grandfather of Joseph Byers, came to America from Germany, in early manhood, and settled near Westminster, Md. He married ---- ----. Their children are: 1, Michael; 2, John Henry; 3, Elizabeth (Mrs. John Power [sic]); 4, Catherine (Mrs. Peter Slagle); 5, Sarah (Mrs. Solomon M. Myesli [sic]); 6, Polly (Mrs. James Orndorf [sic]).*** "

Gabriel "Byers" is buried in the Krider's (St. Benjamin's) Lutheran Church cemetery, Westminster, MD, in sec. B, row 13, lot 26, next to the "consort" of his son Michael. See vol. 5, part 1 CARROLL COUNTY CEMETERIES, p. 100 (Carroll Cnty Genealogical Soc'y: 1999).

Woody Rush comments, in his "Descendants of Caspar Beier," p. 3 (2011):
"Gabriel's surname is spelled Byers on his tombstone, Beyer on his first wife's tombstone, Boyer on his second wife's tombstone and Boyers on the tombstone of his daughter Catharine, all located in Krider's Church Cemetery."

According to "Old Krider's Cemetery Inscriptions," vol. 16, Carrolltonian, p. 10 (1996), the tombstone for Gabriel states:
"In | memory | of | GABRIEL BYERS | who was born December | 1st 1766 and departed this | life July 29th 1835 | aged 68 years 7 months | and 28 days | 'Ye pleasing scenes adieu | which I so long have known | My Friends a long farewell to you | for I must pass along' ". 
Beier / Byers, Gabriel (I6020)
 
7799 Writing about his mother, Jim Wood said: "Evaline Snuffer, 1808-31 March 1886, married Randolph Clark, M.D., 1806-12 April 1877, on 13 July 1827 in Wythe County. He was a son of Fugate and Elizabeth Clark. Evaline and Randolph Clark are buried in the Nunn Cemetery at Allisonia, Va. Children: Josiah, Evaline, Virginia, Oliver, Margaret." Jim Wood, THE SNUFFERS, p. 56.

By the time of the 1850 census, Oliver was no longer living in the family home. That census records his father Randolph Clark, 45, a farmer, living with his wife "Eveline," 42, and the following children: Alonzo, 22, a laborer; Eliza, 19; Lucinda M, 17; Josiah H, 15, a laborer; Elizabeth, 12; Elvira J, 7; Virginia, 4; and Mariah C, 1. 1850 U.S. Census, Dist. 48, Pulaski Cnty, VA (M 432, Roll 971, stamped p. 234B). 
Clark, Oliver (I6379)
 
7800 WW II Draft Records list Raymond W. Cox, born 1918 in Clark Cnty, OH, who enlisted 6 Nov 1943 at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Indiana. He was a high school graduate, and was a "semiskilled" mechanic and repairman.  Cox, Raymond W. (I14416)
 
7801 Yet another story in The DeKalb [IL] Chronicle, p. 6, (3 Aug 1966), takes note of a couple of social events:
"Victor [IL] ***
"Mr. and Mrs. Hugh H. McCleery entertained, Sunday [31 Jul], Mr. and Mrs. Gordon F. Adams and John [sic] of Carol Stream Village, a Wheaton suburb.
"Mrs. Hugh McCleery spent Monday through Wednesday [1 - 3 Aug] in Bloomington [IL], attending the Illinois Agricultural Association State Women's committee meeting. *** " 
McCleery, Hugh Hastings (I13754)
 
7802 Yorkville or Aurora, IL newspaper Obituary [probably Kendall County Record] (17 Mar 1937):
"Mrs. Elizabeth Harris, 66, of Yorkville, died at her home this morning. She was born Nov. 25, 1870, at Hillsboro, O. [sic]
"Surviving are her father, P. E. Croushorn of Yorkville; four sisters, Mrs. Charles Carlson and Mrs. William Campbell of Yorkville, Mrs. Ed Crew and Miss Margaret Croushorn of Aurora, and two brothers, William Croushorn of New Lenox, Ill., and David Croushorn of Chicago.
"Funeral services will be held from Healy chapel.... Interment will be in [illegible] Aurora cemetery."

A similar obituary can be found in the records at the cemetery.

Sarah Margaret Croushorn's notes on Elizabeth read:
"Born in Hillsboro, Ohio, Nov. 25, 1870. Married Robert Harris of Bell, Calif. No Children. Died March 13, 1937; Buried at Aurora, Ill." 
Croushorn, Elizabeth Nelson (I4207)
 
7803 Zola is buried in Krider's Lutheran Church Cemetery in sec. A, row 2, grave 11b, next to her husband. «i»See «/i»vol. 5, part 1, CARROLL COUNTY CEMETERIES, p. 67 (Carroll Cnty Genealogical Soc'y, 1996). Beard, Zola Margaret (I6148)
 
7804 [Note that when Virginia seceded from the United States in 1861, a majority of residents in the western counties objected. Those counties petitioned Congress to be re-admitted to the Union. The State of West Virginia came into existence in 1863. Pendleton Cnty, W.Va. was created from parts of Virginia's Rockingham, August and Hardy counties.] Croushorn, Sarah Byerly (I4519)
 
7805 [Note that when Virginia seceded from the United States in 1861, a majority of residents in the western counties objected. Those counties petitioned Congress to be re-admitted to the Union. The State of West Virginia came into existence in 1863. Pendleton Cnty, W.Va. was created from parts of Virginia's Rockingham, August and Hardy counties.] Croushorn, Lydia (I4520)
 

      «Prev «1 ... 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 Next»